Articles, PSQH December 10, 2012

‘Show Me the Money’ Revisited

by Barry P Chaiken, MD

In the immortal words of Ronald Reagan, “There you go again.” Something that can be explained simply is twisted to look infinitely complicated with plots and subplots that would make J.K Rowling proud. The recent controversy over the use of EMRs to increase reimbursements to providers suggests intrigue, fraud, and bad intent. In contrast, if you learn how the money flows, you will better understand the true reasons for the outcomes seen in organizations using EMRs.

A New York Times report published in September 2012 documented an increase of $1 billion in Medicare reimbursements in 2010 over the amount paid five years earlier. The report partly attributed this payment increase to changes in billing codes assigned to patients in emergency rooms.

Such stories send shivers through the EMR community. To date, hospitals, EMR vendors, and the government struggle to demonstrate the value of EMRs in enhancing patient care and delivering cost savings. With billions of federal dollars earmarked to payment incentives for the use of EMRs, government officials anticipate some kind of return on this investment. Government EMR advocates did not expect to see an increase in reimbursements by public and private payors to providers through “enhanced” billing practices (code optimization [legal] or code maximization/up-coding [illegal]) activities.

Compared to paper records, EMRs allow for more rapid and complete documentation. In addition, EMRs slow the documentation process. Wait, how can EMRs both speed up and slow down documentation? It all depends upon deployment of the EMR and the constructed documentation workflows.

Unfortunately, EMRs focus on two important objectives at the same time– 1) facilitate clinical documentation to deliver patient care, and 2) facilitate clinical documentation to optimize coding for reimbursement. Documenting for patient care does not closely parallel documenting for reimbursement. As long as reimbursement is tied to documentation, EMR documentation workflow will suffer from inefficient documentation workflows, inaccurate documentation of care from global templates, and accidental (or deliberate) upcoding for reimbursement.

Excerpts from: ‘Show Me the Money’ Revisited. PSQH, November/December, 2012

 

Comments 1
  • companies integrate with eloetrcnic medical record and health information systems. I asked him how physicians can get their share of Meaningful Use dollars and video-recorded his

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